SALEM, Ore. (KOIN) — The City of Salem said infants, young children and other vulnerable individuals should not drink the tap water because low levels of toxins from algae blooms have been found in the treated water.

The advisory comes after the Oregon Health Authority detected toxic blue-green algae in Detroit Lake, which is the source of the city’s water.

The advisory applies to City of Salem, City of Turner, Suburban East Salem Water District and Orchard Heights Water Association.

Random samples of water on May 23 and May 25 found the presence of cyanotoxins higher than the US EPA guidelines. Those cyanotoxins are low levels of cylindrospermopsin and microcystin.

Residents in the city should use bottled water for drinking, making infant formula , making ice and preparing food and beverages. The City of Salem said the next update will be Thursday, May 31.

Do Not Boil the tap water. Boiling the water will not destroy cyanotoxins and may increase the toxin levels. 


Here’s what the City of Salem says:

Children under the age of six, people with compromised immune systems, people receiving dialysis treatment, people with pre-existing liver conditions, pets, pregnant women or nursing mothers, or other sensitive populations should follow this advisory.  At this time, people not on this list may continue to drink the water unless additional messaging is received.

> Levels of toxins have been detected in City of Salem that supplies water to City of Salem, City of Turner, Suburban East Salem Water District, and Orchard Heights Water Association. 
> Children under the age of six, people with compromised immune systems, people receiving dialysis treatment, people with pre-existing liver conditions, pets, pregnant women or nursing mothers, or other sensitive populations should follow this advisory.  At this time, people not on this list may continue to drink the water unless additional messaging is received. Please visit CityofSalem.net for the most up to date information.
> City of Salem is continuing to adjust treatment operations to reduce concentrations of cyanotoxins as quickly as possible.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.