Oregon Symphony turns music into light with new tech

Local

The Oregon Symphony has a new way to reach an audience it hasn't reached before

PORTLAND, Ore. (KOIN) — Members of the Oregon Symphony treated more than 200 deaf and hard of hearing children to a concert Tuesday morning.

The music was part of the focus but the game-changer was new software allowing hard of hearing kids to see and feel the music.

CymaSpace, a digital lighting and multi-media technology from a Portland non-profit, is helping hard of hearing people experience music by turning it into light.

Members of the Oregon Symphony treated more than 200 deaf and hard of hearing children to a concert on September 24, 2019. (KOIN)

“The lights themselves actually analyze the sound that the musicians are making and the microphones that are attached to their instruments are fed into our computer and the computer is what creates the visual that matches the sound information,” said…

Light banks behind the musicians change color — higher and power pitch sounds have their own light array signature. The magnitude of sound creates brighter colors and lights pulse to keep the beat.

For the Oregon Symphony, it’s a way to reach a new audience.

“The more we do it the more they’ll get the idea of what the color represents and they’ll, of course, feel it in their bodies and able to see it and enjoy it so much more than they ever have before,” said Monica Hayes, the Oregon Symphony director of learning and community engagement programs.

Be it Star Wars or the sound replicating an elephant — it’s a new world of music for many kids who are now able to experience what they haven’t been able to hear before.

Copyright 2019 Nexstar Broadcasting, Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

Top Headlines

More News

Trending Stories

Don't Miss

More Don't Miss

Twitter News Widget