OHA: Oregon sets another daily COVID case record at 6,203

Coronavirus

PORTLAND, Ore. (KOIN) — As the omicron variant continues to flood the state with new infections, Oregon set a third-consecutive single-day record for new COVID-19 cases, the Oregon Health Authority reported Wednesday.

Another 6,203 new confirmed and presumptive positive COVID cases were recorded in 34 of Oregon’s 35 counties, bringing the state total to 441,648. Nine of the counties recorded triple-digit cases, including counties with sparse populations like Umatilla, which registered 218 new infections. Multnomah County recorded 1,268 cases.

Despite its apparent lack in severity when compared to the delta variant, the highly contagious omicron variant has worried experts and health officials because the surge in cases threatens to overwhelm an already taxed hospital system.

Across the state, just 5% (33) of adult ICU beds are open compared to 9% reported on Tuesday, according to OHA. Only 6% (226) of adult non-ICU beds are available in total, OHA said.

However, the 7-day running average for vaccinations increased again to 10,435 doses per day.

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OHA — Hospitalization data

The full list of cases by county recorded January 5, 2022:

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (17), Benton (214), Clackamas (594), Clatsop (46), Columbia (49), Coos (136), Crook (37), Curry (5), Deschutes (716), Douglas (93), Gilliam (1), Grant (26), Hood River (37), Jackson (264), Jefferson (77), Josephine (89), Klamath (24), Lake (2), Lane (518), Lincoln (52), Linn (206), Malheur (14), Marion (395), Morrow (29), Multnomah (1268), Polk (94), Tillamook (29), Umatilla (218), Union (10), Wallowa (9), Wasco (23), Washington (874), Wheeler (3) and Yamhill (34).

Nine new COVID-19-related deaths brought the state’s death toll to 5,719, OHA reported.

Oregon’s 5,711th COVID-19-related death is a 47-year-old woman from Yamhill County who tested positive Dec. 27 and died Dec. 27 at Salem Hospital. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,712th COVID-19-related death is a 72-year-old woman from Yamhill County who tested positive Oct. 23 and died Nov. 28 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,713th COVID-19-related death is a 62-year-old man from Washington County who tested positive Dec. 1 and died Dec. 30 at Oregon Health & Science University Hospital. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 5,714th COVID-19-related death is a 93-year-old woman from Tillamook County who tested positive Dec. 27 and died Jan. 1 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,715th COVID-19-related death is a 58-year-old woman from Tillamook County who tested positive Dec. 10 and died Jan. 3 at Oregon Health & Science University Hospital. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,716th COVID-19-related death is a 69-year-old woman from Polk County who tested positive Dec. 2 and died Jan. 2 at Salem Hospital. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 5,717th COVID-19-related death is an 80-year-old man from Linn County who tested positive Dec. 17 and died Jan. 4 at Good Samaritan Regional Hospital. He had no underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,718th COVID-19-related death is a 76-year-old woman from Josephine County who tested positive Dec. 13 and died Jan. 4 at Asante Rogue Regional Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,719th COVID-19-related death is a 74-year-old man from Coos County who tested positive Dec. 6 and died Dec. 20 at St. Luke’s Medical Center in Idaho. He had underlying conditions.

The goal of getting 1 million Oregonians a booster shot by the end of January continues. As of Wednesday, Oregon needs 770,309 people to get a booster to reach the goal.

The Oregon Hospital Association put a message out Wednesday evening saying hospitalizations from omicron are rising and so are the numbers of patients waiting for a staffed bed. 

Many can’t be discharged into next level of care because there’s nowhere for them to go due to staffing shortages. They’re imploring people to help ease the pressure on hospital capacity by getting vaccinated. 

Greg Vaughn was one of the many people who showed up to the walk-in vaccine clinic at Cornelius Elementary in Hillsboro. 

“Actually it was on Facebook, my wife saw it and was like ‘hey don’t you need a booster’ and I was like ‘yes’ and it’s just right around the corner so why not?” Vaughn said.

Washington County Public Health says their mobile vaccine team will have two more clinics this week and then one each week through the rest of the month. 

“With the kids, that’s the hardest part is waiting in line,” Alicia said.

Alicia and Justin Marble both got booster shots Wednesday night. 

The couple said their son is vaccinated and if the FDA approves booster shots for children under 12 it’s likely he’ll get one. 

“Our society’s been using vaccinations for a long time – it’s nothing new,” Justin said.

The Marbles say they’re not concerned about the omicron surge causing major shutdowns like we saw in 2020 but still want to do their part to limit the spread. 

“I think this virus is here to stay with us so, it’s just a matter of learning to live with it and trying to limit the negative effects of it,” Justin said.

Washington County is having two more walk in vaccine clinics this week – one Thursday in Tigard, the other on Saturday in Cornelius. They have three more planned after that.

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