A year later, Saudi journalist’s killing haunts kingdom

International
Jamal Khashoggi

FILE – In this Nov. 2, 2018 file photo, a video image of Hatice Cengiz, fiancee of slain Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi, is played during an event to remember Khashoggi, who died inside the Saudi Consulate in Istanbul on Oct. 2, 2018, in Washington. The killing of Washington Post columnist Jamal Khashoggi at the Saudi Consulate in Istanbul drew renewed scrutiny to the kingdom, as his son and a U.N. investigator spoke out Tuesday, Oct. 1, 2019, ahead of the anniversary of his death. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)

This is an archived article and the information in the article may be outdated. Please look at the time stamp on the story to see when it was last updated.

DUBAI, United Arab Emirates (AP) — The killing of Washington Post columnist Jamal Khashoggi at the Saudi Consulate in Istanbul is drawing renewed scrutiny to the kingdom.

Khashoggi’s son and a U.N. investigator spoke out on Tuesday, on the eve of the anniversary of his brutal slaying.

Saudi intelligence officials and a forensic doctor killed and dismembered Khashoggi on Oct. 2, 2018, just as his fiancée waited outside the diplomatic post.

Khashoggi, long a royal court insider, had been in self-imposed exile in the U.S. while writing critically of Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, son Saudi King Salman.

While the crown prince recently told CBS’ “60 Minutes” he did not order the writer’s killing, U.S. lawmakers and U.N. investigator Agnes Callamard laid the blame for the slaying on the prince.

Copyright 2020 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Trending Stories

Don't Miss

More Don't Miss